Brandeis University , located 9 miles outside of Boston with easy commuting options, has a unique, collaborative life science research community spanning Biology, Neuroscience, Biochemistry, Biophysics and Chemistry. Our University benefits from many shared resources including core facilities, seminars, a strong Drosophila/invertebrate research community, and interdisciplinary training and research programs. 

 

The Rodal lab is a scientifically stimulating, supportive, and interactive environment that combines mechanistic cell biology and Drosophila neurobiology to answer fundamental questions about how neurons employ and regulate specialized membrane traffic machinery. We place strong emphasis on teamwork and mentorship, and quickly bring new members up to speed with hands-on training in microscopy, biochemistry, and Drosophila genetics. We strongly value oral and written communication skills, independent scientific thinking, and proactive scientific discourse. All lab members work with Avi to develop an annual individual development plan (IDP), which defines a training and mentoring strategy to reach their career goals. Avi's mentoring statement can be found here.

 

We are accepting applications for postdoctoral fellows. Candidates (domestic or international) must have earned a Ph.D. and have publication record in an area related to our lab’s research. We are especially interested in candidates with experience in one or more of the following areas: biochemical/biophysical analyses of protein-membrane interactions, Drosophila genetics, neurobiology and electrophysiology, electron microscopy, live imaging (in any system), biochemical purifications and mass spectrometry of complex mixtures of proteins. Successful applicants will have a strong record of productivity, and have published first author papers in internationally recognized journals. 

 

To be considered, please submit CV and contact information for at least three professional references as a single PDF file, to arodal@brandeis.edu.

Structured illumination microscopy of a Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction labeled with antibodies against distinct presynaptic and postsynaptic membrane structures (magenta anti-HRP, green anti-amphiphysin, red anti-syndapin, cyan anti-Dlg).